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..The 1928 Tudor Windlace - "Those Mysterious Holes"
When Ford introduced the 1927 Model T Tudor Sedan, the Engineering Department decided to run the windlace, which attached to the Pillar (quarter door lock) Assembly, all the way down to inside the door cavity (this feature was not seen on any 1926 Tudor Sedans).


The windlace was then attached in the corner with a sheet metal screw. This feature carried over into the new 1928 Model A Ford Tudor Sedan. The hole for which the sheet metal screw is attached to is on most 1928 and 1929 Coupes and Tudor Sedans. However, it is thought that this feature only pertains to the Tudor Sedan and NOT the Coupes but I may be proven wrong. If you have this feature or know of someone who has this feature on their car, would you be so kind as to email me so it can be recorded?

If you have any of these and would like to add the data to this database, please contact me.

Thanks.

Steve

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..Available For Viewing - Those "Mysterious Holes" Study
     
  "Those Mysterious Holes" Study
Click Here or the PDF ICON To View

PLEASE NOTE: This is 90kb file.
If you do not have high speed internet, it may take you awhile to download
     
     
  Those Mysterious Holes" Study - Epilogue
Click Here or the PDF ICON To View

PLEASE NOTE: This is 85kb file.
If you do not have high speed internet, it may take you awhile to download
     
Want to see the Screw?
click here
     
Want to see the Windlace Screw Hole?
click here
     
Want to see the Windlace?
click here
     
 
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